Microsoft would do well to take a look out of the Windows

Over the last few months I have, with increased frequency, received emails from a gentleman who in lieu of the traditional “Kind Regards” or “Many Thanks” signs off on his correspondence with “Hugs, Kisses, Unicorn Giggles.” Rather than mistake these communiqués as having made it through my spam filter to offer me the Harry Potter box-set, cut price Viagra or appendage enlargements, I know them to pertain to the publication schedule for African Scene. It is to this aim that I sit down to pen something supposedly intelligent but most likely rather more opinionated for inclusion in this week’s schedule of posts. I would like to share some of my thoughts on recent developments from the Microsoft Windows stable. And no, this is not an indication that I will be getting into the decidedly tiresome debate on which blows my skirt up most – Window, Linux or Mac. Rather I am interested in continuing a conversation started earlier with a few colleagues on the subject of the Windows Phone. This product Microsoft hopes will have healing powers for its share of the smart-phone market. My conversational position specifically centres on where the US$400 million Microsoft is reportedly spending on the launch is going. Catching the subway earlier this evening I waded through the ‘first-world’s’ obligatory flow of subterranean bodies wired into one or another mobile device. At the same time I passed a variety of media propagating the Windows Phone as Redmond’s gift to mobile telephony. While evident, the marketing is not persistent. Comparatively Kellogg’s bi-seasonal ad campaign to claim your breakfast bowl has been more prevalent, the budget for which is relatively negligible. Microsoft tells us their newest edition of operating system (OS) for mobile phone handsets will stem the flow of asocial behaviour that results from our permanent attachment to our phones. Cut the wires that bind so to speak. Microsoft, liberator of phone users everywhere? I think not! Not while we are debating where that US$400 million is ending up. What...

read more